“Glory Days”

by Nika

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Monroe Place, the Drish plantation that included the Drish House, was sold at public auction in 1869, as Dr. Drish had died an impoverished man.  The plantation and house were purchased by a Northport, Alabama merchant and lawyer named E. A. Powell.  Mr. Powell graciously allowed Sarah Drish to continue living in the house until her death fifteen years later.   Sarah’s stepdaughter, Catherine, moved out of the house after her father’s death and went to live with one of her sons. Once one of the wealthiest women in Tuscaloosa, it is easy to imagine that Sarah Drish lived out her life in lonely genteel poverty, as her once grand house fell into disrepair.  Although it is hard to guess her emotions about the house, as she grieved for her husband and former life, I am sure she was saddened by its decline.  Perhaps she saw the house as a metaphor for her own aging.  They were both the products of a South that no longer existed.

After Sarah’s death in 1884, the house soon caught the eye of a another lady, a friend of Sarah’s, who was to give it an injection of new life.  Mr. Powell sold the estate to The Tuskaloosa Coal, Iron and Land Company in 1887.  The company subdivided the old plantation and started building houses on the lots.  The house itself was sold to Judge William Cochrane.  He  and his family subsequently undertook a major renovation.  On May 3, 1888, The Tuscaloosa Gazette reported “Mr. Cochrane is having valuable improvements made to the old Drish place which will ad much to the grandeur of that beautiful mansion.” The renovations took about a year to complete.  The work was primarily on the interior of the house, since no large scale architectural changes were made. Mrs. Cochrane likely modernized the kitchen and redecorated.  I like to think that she and I are kindred spirits, both us seeing potential in the Drish House!  The Cochrane’s were to live in the house until 1903.